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When you think of the ’80s, a few images come to mind: shoulder pads, big hair, and all-cheesy-everything. However, the decade had more to contribute to pop culture than being known as the New Jersey of the 20th century. It was also an era for incredible classic movies, ones that shifted the film industry as we know it. From John Hughes’ The Breakfast Club to Steven Spielberg’s E.T., the movies of the 1980’s not only shaped its generation but inspired subsequent generations in every way imaginable.

The following decade of films were equally memorable, Is it really possible to pick a single best movie of the 1990s? This is the decade that gave us Goodfellas in 1990, Fight Club in 1999 and countless masterpieces in between. It was a decade when Quentin Tarantino went from video store clerk to the hottest director in town. At least a few of the films we revisit are guaranteed to be close to your heart and ours. So we invite you to find a comfortable spot on the sofa, and join us for a journey through our vast VHS collections.

Wildcats (1986)

If you thought “woman football coach in 1986” was the daring part of “Wildcats,” think again. This Goldie Hawn classic was raunchy, sneaky and full of representation.  “Wildcats” got Big D to open up about being a soft child. It gave Gene a chance to talk about his illustrious football...

Revenge of the Ninja (1983)

After his family is killed in Japan by ninjas, Cho and his son Kane come to America to start a new life. He opens a doll shop but is unwittingly importing heroin into the dolls. When he finds out that his friend has betrayed him, Cho must prepare for the...

Invictus (2009)

After his 27-year imprisonment and subsequent election as President of South Africa, Nelson Mandela faces the task of unifying a country divided by race. Only months since the end of Apartheid, divisions still exist between the country’s whites and blacks, something Mandela notices during an international rugby match. Realising black supporters cheer on the opposing side when their white Springboks take to the field.

The Return of The Living Dead (1985)

When foreman Frank (James Karen) shows new employee Freddy (Thom Mathews) a secret military experiment in a supply warehouse, the two klutzes accidentally release a gas that reanimates corpses into flesh-eating zombies. As the epidemic spreads throughout Louisville, Ky., and the creatures satisfy their hunger in gory and outlandish ways, Frank and Freddy fight to survive with the help of their boss (Clu Gulager) and a mysterious mortician (Don Calfa).

Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

A comedic send-up of the grim circumstances of the Middle Ages as told through the story of King Arthur and framed by a modern-day murder investigation. When the mythical king of the Britons leads his knights on a quest for the Holy Grail, they face a wide array of horrors, including a persistent Black Knight, a three-headed giant, a cadre of shrubbery-challenged knights, the perilous Castle Anthrax, a killer rabbit, a house of virgins, and a handful of rude Frenchmen.

The Long Kiss Goodnight (1996)

Schoolteacher and single mother Samantha Caine (Geena Davis) lives an average suburban life — until she begins having strange memories of unexplained violence and discovers that she has physical skills that she never imagined. Hiring private detective Mitch Hennessey (Samuel L. Jackson) to probe into her past, Samantha discovers that she’s a well-trained government assassin who went missing after suffering a bout of amnesia and that her former handlers want her back in their employ.

Ordinary People (1980)

Tormented by guilt following the death of his older brother, Buck, in a sailing accident, alienated teenager Conrad Jarrett (Timothy Hutton) attempts suicide. Returning home following an extended stay in a psychiatric hospital, Conrad tries to deal with his mental anguish and also reconnect with his mother, Beth (Mary Tyler Moore), who has grown cold and angry, and his emotionally wounded father, Calvin (Donald Sutherland), with the help of his psychiatrist, Dr. Berger (Judd Hirsch).

Blazing Saddles (1974)

In this satirical take on Westerns, crafty railroad worker Bart (Cleavon Little) becomes the first black sheriff of Rock Ridge, a frontier town about to be destroyed in order to make way for a new railroad. Initially, the people of Rock Ridge harbor a racial bias toward their new leader. However, they warm to him after realizing that Bart and his perpetually drunk gunfighter friend (Gene Wilder) are the only defense against a wave of thugs sent to rid the town of its population.